Agreement On The Cooperation For The Sustainable Development Of The Mekong River Basin

The MRC has been reluctant to raise any concerns about China`s upstream hydroelectric development. For example, in a letter to the Bangkok Post, mrc CEO Dr. Olivier Cogels argued that Chinese dams would increase the volume of the river`s dry season because their focus is on generating electricity, not irrigation. [46] While such dams could certainly increase dry-season flows, the only certainty of China`s future reservoir policy is that they will be manufactured outside of downstream cooperation regimes. [5] The public statements of the MRC leaders in the same way as Cogels` comments gave the RCN the reputation of being complicit in the fact that “the Chinese dam machine is swimming downstream.” [47] The Agreement allows for cooperation between Cambodia and Vietnam in order to facilitate the transport of water for goods and passengers from third countries on the territory of the Contracting Parties. [Further information on this Agreement is available from the Treaty Section, New York, NY, 10017 (paras.: (1) (212) 963-5047; Fax (1) (212) 963-4879).] The U.S. administration – which feared that poverty in the basin would contribute to the strength of communist movements – proved to be one of the Committee`s strongest international supporters, with the Bureau of Refugees conducting a groundbreaking study of the basin`s potential in 1956. [7] [5] Another study by American geographer Gilbert F. White`s 1962, Economic and Social Aspects of Lower Mekong Development, proved to be extremely influential, which led to the postponement (according to White`s estimates) of the construction of the Pa Mong General Dam (still unfulone), which would have displaced a quarter of a million people. [8] U.S. influence on the formation of the Committee is also manifested in the development studies of General Raymond Wheeler, former chief of the Army Corps of Engineers, the role of C. Hart Schaaf as executive agent of the Mekong Committee from 1959 to 1969, and President Lyndon Johnson`s promotion of the committee as the potential to “eclipse even our own television.” [5] However, US financial aid ceased in 1975 and did not resume for decades due to embargoes on Cambodia (until 1992) and Vietnam (until 1994), followed by periods of trade restrictions.

[9] Makim[10] argues, however, that the Committee was “largely unins influenced by the formal or informal United States. . . .