As Well As Subject Verb Agreement

In the present, nouns and verbs form plural in opposite ways: broken expressions like half, part of, a percentage of, a majority of are sometimes singular and sometimes plural, depending on the meaning. (The same is true, of course, if everyone, everyone, more, most and some act as subjects.) Sums and products of mathematical processes are expressed in singular and require singular verbs. The phrase “more than one” (strangely) takes on a singular verb: “More than one student has tried to do it.” sugar is unaccountable; Therefore, the sentence has a singular verb. However, the plural is used when the focus is on the individual in the group. It is much rarer. In informal writings, none, and both sometimes take on a plural veneer, when these pronouns are followed by a prepositional sentence that begins with . . .