Trade Agreements For Turkey

In Chapter 6, the Parties recognise that anti-competitive business practices may undermine the benefits of liberalisation under the Agreement. They stress the importance of cooperation and consultation on competition law enforcement. In addition, the Chapter provides the Parties with the opportunity to take appropriate action where an anti-competitive practice continues to affect trade, despite prior cooperation and consultation. Priority shall be given to measures which least disturb the functioning of this Agreement. The agreement covers trade in industrial products, seafood and processed agricultural products. The transitional period ended on 1 January 1999. In addition, bilateral agricultural agreements have been concluded between the various EFTA States and Turkey, which are part of the instruments for the creation of the free trade area. The agreement contains detailed provisions on trade facilitation (Annex VI), including certain “WTO+” elements. Turkey is a member of the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership (Euromed) and, as such, should conclude free trade agreements with all other Mediterranean partners in order to create a Euro-Mediterranean free trade area. The customs union entered into force on 31 December 1995. It covers all industrial goods, but not agriculture (with the exception of processed agricultural products), services or public procurement. Bilateral trade concessions apply to agricultural products as well as coal and steel products.

The Agreement contains provisions on trade policy remedies (Articles 2.17-2.19), namely subsidies and countervailing measures, anti-dumping measures and global safeguard measures based on the relevant WTO agreements. The Turkey-EU Customs Union has abolished customs duties, quantitative restrictions and measures with equivalent effect in trade in industrial goods in order to guarantee the free movement of goods. As a result of the customs union, Turkey opened its internal market to competition in the EU and third countries and guaranteed its exporters free access to the EU market. In addition, Turkey has committed to adapt to the preferential regimes applied by the EU towards third countries and to align its legislation in a wide range of areas, including standards and technical legislation, as well as competition policy, with the acquis communautaire. However, trade in agricultural products shall be managed under the preferential arrangements between the Contracting Parties; while trade in steel products is governed by the Free Trade Agreement between Turkey and the European Coal and Steel Community. . . .